April242014

thegirlandherbooks:

Mya Gosling and her succinct Shakespeare comics “In 3 Panels”. Achingly simple, these short comic strips provide a concise beginning-middle-end guide to many of Shakespeare’s classic and obscure works.

More here: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/shakespeare-summarised-in-short-comics

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)

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buonfresco:

19th & 20th century tiaras

(via one-thousand-thoughts)

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“… what if loving something means you should mostly feel frustrated and thwarted, and then a little ruined, too, by the pursuit. But that you still come back for more…” Chang-Rae Lee, On Such A Full Sea  (via thegirlandherbooks)

(Source: susanazialcita, via thegirlandherbooks)

words 

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huffingtonpost:

Here are some festivities honoring the great poet, playwright and actor here.

(via harktorambler)

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“So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.” Shakespeare, Sonnet XVIII (via mediumaevum)

(via harktorambler)

April232014
“You like to write. It’s the single most important quality for someone who wants to be a writer. But not in itself enough.” Haruki Murakami (via writingbox)

(via yeahwriters)

11PM
“What has changed in 450 years of performing, reading, writing Shakespeare? The history of women interacting with Shakespeare’s plays is also the history of women’s rights, suffrage, and of the feminist movement. It is a history of women being silenced and of finding ways to speak out anyway. Shakespeare has been, and is, an uneasy ally in this history. He complicates but also enriches our idea of what a woman is. Too often we are still Katherinas, forced to compromise our dignity in order to retain our voice, or else our insistence on speaking is blamed for our tragedies, like Juliet. But the reason why we still read Shakespeare’s women, is that they are women. Goneril, Juliet, and Katherina are finally not ciphers. Whatever else they may be, they are true women, and they have true voices.” Stefanie Peters,”450 Years of Juliets: On Women Making Shakespeare” (via millionsmillions)

(via yeahwriters)

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vampireacademybloodlinesfans:

I have 100+ TBR books. How many do you have TBR?
Source: Random House, Inc.

Bookcase? more like room so stuffed that new books must be tossed in and the door quickly shut to prevent an outpouring avalanche of wood pulp and knowledge.

vampireacademybloodlinesfans:

I have 100+ TBR books. How many do you have TBR?

Source: Random House, Inc.

Bookcase? more like room so stuffed that new books must be tossed in and the door quickly shut to prevent an outpouring avalanche of wood pulp and knowledge.

(via library-lessons)

11PM
“People who read are people who dream, and we connect through the stories we live and tell and read” Amy Poehler, Honorary Chairperson of World Book Night US (via thehpalliance)

(via bookporn)

11PM
thatlitsite:

APRIL 23 / WORLD BOOK DAY
La Diada de Sant Jordi (Catalan pronunciation: [ɫə ðiˈaðə ðə ˈsaɲ ˈʒɔrði], Saint George’s Day), also known as El dia de la Rosa (The Day of the Rose) or El dia del Llibre (The Day of the Book) is a Catalan holiday held on 23 April, with similarities to Valentine’s Day and some unique twists that reflect the antiquity of the celebrations. The main event is the exchange of gifts between sweethearts, loved ones and colleagues. Historically, men gave women roses, and women gave men a book to celebrate the occasion — “a rose for love and a book forever.” In modern times, the mutual exchange of books is also customary. Roses have been associated with this day since medieval times, but the giving of books is a more recent tradition originating in 1923, when a bookseller started to promote the holiday as a way to commemorate the nearly simultaneous deaths of Miguel Cervantes and William Shakespeare on 23 April 1616. Barcelona is the publishing capital of both Catalan and Spanish languages and the combination of love and literacy was quickly adopted.
Read More

This is an amazing cultural holiday that I hope to join someday in Barcelona! Giving books and flowers to friends and loved ones? Brilliant. Count me in.

thatlitsite:

APRIL 23 / WORLD BOOK DAY

La Diada de Sant Jordi (Catalan pronunciation: [ɫə ðiˈaðə ðə ˈsaɲ ˈʒɔrði], Saint George’s Day), also known as El dia de la Rosa (The Day of the Rose) or El dia del Llibre (The Day of the Book) is a Catalan holiday held on 23 April, with similarities to Valentine’s Day and some unique twists that reflect the antiquity of the celebrations. The main event is the exchange of gifts between sweethearts, loved ones and colleagues. Historically, men gave women roses, and women gave men a book to celebrate the occasion — “a rose for love and a book forever.” In modern times, the mutual exchange of books is also customary. Roses have been associated with this day since medieval times, but the giving of books is a more recent tradition originating in 1923, when a bookseller started to promote the holiday as a way to commemorate the nearly simultaneous deaths of Miguel Cervantes and William Shakespeare on 23 April 1616. Barcelona is the publishing capital of both Catalan and Spanish languages and the combination of love and literacy was quickly adopted.

Read More

This is an amazing cultural holiday that I hope to join someday in Barcelona! Giving books and flowers to friends and loved ones? Brilliant. Count me in.

(via bookporn)

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